What Is Ruth’S Dream In A Raisin In The Sun?

What Is Ruth
1. What are the hopes and aspirations of the main characters, Mama, Ruth, Beneatha, and Walter, and how are these hopes and aspirations frustrated throughout the story? Mama has visions of uprooting her family from their claustrophobic apartment and relocating them into a house with a yard, where the kids can run about and play and Mama can care to a garden.

Since she and her husband moved into the flat that the Youngers currently occupy, her desire has been put on hold for the foreseeable future. Her aspiration serves as a daily inspiration for her to fulfill her financial responsibilities. But despite the fact that she and her husband put in a lot of effort, they were unable to scrounge together sufficient funds to turn their dream become a reality.

Following his passing, Mama will have the chance to put her plan into action for the very first time thanks to the insurance money. There are several parallels between Ruth’s dream and Mama’s. She has the goal of raising a joyful family and she thinks that a step toward achieving this will be to purchase a home that is larger and of higher quality.

  1. A lack of funds prevents Ruth from realizing her ambition as well.
  2. As a result, she and Walter are compelled to reside in a cramped apartment, and Travis, their son, is had to sleep on the sofa.
  3. Walter has the ambition to one day become wealthy and provide for his family in the same manner as the wealthy folks he drives around.

He frequently describes this goal in terms of his family, expressing his desire to provide for them in a way that he was unable to do for himself. The financial struggles that his family is going through make him feel like a slave. Because of his poverty and inability to locate work that is suitable for him, his goal has been put on hold.

His perspective on his goal of amassing material wealth shifts during the course of the play, and by the time it is through, he no longer considers achieving this goal to be his main priority.2. What does Mama’s plant symbolize, and how does the significance of the symbol change during the course of the play? The fragile yet hardy nature of Mama’s plant is a metaphor for her aspiration to one day reside in a more spacious home complete with a grassy yard, and the fact that she tends to her plant is a reflection of her commitment to realizing that ambition.

The first thing that Mama does is get up early in the morning and pull out her plant. In point of fact, she does it right after getting out of bed, and as a result, we learn right away in the play that both her plant and her dream are of the utmost significance to her.

  • Mama acknowledges that the plant has never been given a enough amount of sunlight, yet despite this, it has managed to live.
  • To put it another way, she has never fully realized her goal, but the desire to do so persists.
  • At the conclusion of the play, Mama makes the decision to transport the plant with her and her family to their new residence.

By doing so, she bestows the plant with a fresh layer of importance. In the beginning, it represented her dream that was still in the future, but now that it has come true, it reminds her of the perseverance she showed by working hard and being patient for such a long time.3.

  • What kind of impact does the characterization of the Youngers’ flat have on the overall atmosphere of the play? As a result of the fact that the entirety of the play takes place within its four walls, the Youngers’ apartment is responsible for establishing the tone and mood of the whole thing.
  • The Youngers, particularly Walter, have the impression that they are hemmed in by their lifestyle, the ghetto in which they live, and their financial predicament as a result of all three factors.

This sense of being hemmed in is brought home by the stage that Hansberry constructs for the play. The absence of natural light in the apartment is one factor that contributes to the feeling of confinement there. The minuscule quantity of light that is able to find its way into the flat is a reminder of the Youngers’ dreams as well as of the indefinite postponement of those dreams.

What is Ruth’s dream in A Raisin in the Sun quotes?

RUTH: They said Saturday, and today is merely Friday. I hopes to God that you ain’t going to get up here first thing this morning and start talking to me about not having any money, because I about don’t want to hear it. (in Act I, Scene I) Ruth is worn down by Walter’s never-ending discussion about money.

  1. Ruth’s primary responsibilities in life are taking care of their boy and maintaining the household.
  2. Ruth reminds her coworkers that even though it is Friday, they should not assume that she is free from duty because she has another full day scheduled.
  3. At this point, she is too worn out to have a conversation about money.

Ruth is a character that possesses a high degree of emotional resilience; rather than focusing on the aspirations that she harbors, she is preoccupied with the routine activities that dominate her existence. RUTH: What could possibly be so delightful about this? (Act I, scene I After Walter asks Ruth why she can’t be more polite, Ruth snaps out at him in a furious manner.

  1. The fact that Walter gave Travis an additional fifty cents, which she considers to be money they cannot afford to give to him, has displeased her.
  2. It is clear from Walter’s behavior that he is more concerned that Travis will believe they do not have any money than that they actually do not have any money.

The conversation that Ruth had with Walter exposes how the strain on their finances, as well as their divergent perspectives on the matter, puts their marriage at risk. RUTH, with weariness in her voice, said, “Honey, you never say anything new.” Every day, every night, and every morning, I get up and listen to you, yet you never say anything novel.

Gesturing with the shrug) So you’d rather be Mr. Arnold himself than his chauffeur, huh? Therefore, if I had the choice, I would prefer be residing in Buckingham Palace. (In the first act, scene one) Ruth is venting her frustration with Walter because of his obsession with money. She is the only character in the drama who has accepted the reality that her goals and ambitions will never be realized.

She has this fantasy that she would one day live in a house that is more beautiful than the one they currently occupy, but she is well aware that this will never happen. In spite of the fact that Ruth’s observation of Walter highlights her profound pessimism, it also represents their reality, which is that Walter is obsessed on something that Ruth feels will never change.

RUTH: What do you mean when you say he has a superficial personality? He has plenty of money! So, little girl, what additional characteristics does a man have to posses in order to win your approval? (Act I, scene I Beneatha receives an explanation from Ruth on why she thinks it is unfair for her to not be interested in George.

Beneatha’s decision to turn down a wealthy suitor comes seen as nearly an insult to Ruth, whose life is being stifled by the pressures of their financial situation. Ruth views the opportunity that has presented itself for Beneatha and her family to escape their life of abject destitution as a blessing.

Both Ruth and Beneatha are realistic and practical women, but in very different ways. RUTH: I’m all okay (The glassy look in her eyes begins to fade, and she soon breaks down into a hysterical bout of crying. The chime may be heard)” (Act I, Scene II) The contrast between Ruth’s comments and her subsequent fall reflect the toll that her life has taken on her, both physically and emotionally.

Ruth’s words reveal the toll that her life has taken on her. Ruth, ever the practical and hard worker, is extremely overwhelmed, but she seeks to reject her reality by proclaiming out loud that she is OK. Despite the fact that she is fully overwhelmed, Ruth is always very pragmatic.

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What does Ruth want in A Raisin in the Sun?

In the book “A Raisin in the Sun,” the character Ruth wants nothing more than for her family to be happy. She desires nothing more than for her husband to experience a sense of fulfillment and for her son Travis to be provided for in every aspect of his life.

What is Ruth’s dream in A Raisin in the Sun in Act 2?

Act II, Scene I: Later on the same Saturday, Beneatha comes from her room dressed in the Nigerian attire that Asagai has provided her. She is accompanied by Asagai. She walks about the room singing and chanting “OCOMOGOSIAY” while she claims to be doing a traditional tribal dance at the same time.

Ruth considers Beneatha’s pageantry to be ridiculous, and she asks Beneatha about it. In the meantime, Walter arrives home in a drunken state. When he sees Beneatha all decked out, he joins her in enacting some made-up tribal rites. At one point, he stands on a table and declares himself “Flaming Spear.” Ruth watches with a weary expression.

Beneatha is waiting for George Murchison, who will pick her up. When Beneatha takes off her headpiece, it is clear that she has shaved off the majority of her hair, leaving just an afro that has not been straightened. After everyone is startled, amazed, and even little dissatisfied with Beneatha, a heated dispute over the significance of their African origin ensues between Beneatha and George.

  • While Beneatha makes her way to the dressing room, Walter and George discuss their respective business strategies.
  • George does not appear interested.
  • As Walter continues to make fun of George’s white sneakers, he eventually becomes aggressive.
  • Ruth quickly explains, much to everyone’s embarrassment, that the white shoes are just part of the “college style.” When George refers to Walter as “Prometheus,” it is clear that he has a superiority complex, which only serves to infuriate Walter further.

When George and Beneatha were finally on their way out of the house, Ruth and Walter began to argue about Walter’s decision to go out, spend money, and socialize with individuals like Willy Harris. However, they do start to make up for lost time by admitting that a significant amount of space has developed between them.

When Mama got home, she informed the family that she had used some of the money from the insurance to make a down payment on a house. When Ruth hears this news, she is overjoyed since she, too, had fantasized of relocating her family from their present flat into a more respectable house. In the meantime, Walter is showing clear signs of agitation since he is adamant about investing all of the money in the attempt to open a booze store.

They are all filled with dread after learning that the property is located in Clybourne Park, a community that is composed mainly of white people. Mama begs them to realize that this was the only house in their price range that they could purchase. She is under the impression that it is necessary for her to purchase the home in order to keep the family together.

What is Travis Younger’s dream in A Raisin in the Sun?

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry as an Example of the Craft of Social Criticism TABLE OF CONTENTS Home Context of Historical Events Epigraph Mama Walter Bennie It was Ruth Travis. Bibliography A Few Notes and Credits The Homepage for English 217 Analyse of the character: The Younger Travis “Perhaps it’s just sagging / Under the weight of a hefty load,” Travis is part of the sixth generation of his family to be born and raised in the United States, and his presence is a monument to the diligence and perseverance of his forefathers.

  • In compared to the lives of white families in the middle class, the Younger family leads what is considered a disadvantaged existence.
  • The blessings that they currently enjoy may be seen when one takes a moment to reflect on the struggles that were necessary to achieve independence and get them to a position where they are able to get married, rent an apartment, and lead a life of their own provision.

Regardless, the family never stops striving to achieve more, not only for themselves but also for the generations who will come after them, including Travis. He is carrying a lot of other people’s expectations and hopes on his shoulders at the moment.

  • Travis represents a significant financial investment for his family in many respects.
  • His future holds the promise of putting an end to the accumulated stresses and weights of dissatisfaction that have been passed down through the centuries.
  • Every member of Travis’s family works hard to protect and provide for him in the belief that doing so would help him live a life that is richer in possibility and promise.

Because he is still a child, the thoughts and expectations that other people have for him are what make up his dream. The family has made it quite apparent that they do not want Travis to follow in his father’s footsteps and work manual labor as an adult, despite the absence of any particular reasons.

  • They want him to have a position where he can get respect and go up in the company, and they want him to have those possibilities.
  • Throughout the course of the play, Travis is under constant pressure to think on a grand scale and perform at a higher level than his predecessors.
  • His connection with his parents reflects the growing pains that come with transitioning from a boy to an adult.

Ruth hopes that by exposing her kid to adversity he will develop the mental fortitude necessary to rise beyond his working-class background when he is an adult. This is something that Walter experiences as well, but in an effort to demonstrate that he can adequately provide for his kid, he frequently works against Ruth’s efforts.

An illustration of this dispute is when Ruth says she won’t give Travis fifty cents, but then Walter says he will give Travis one dollar. Ruth’s decision was ultimately overturned by Walter’s decision. In a figurative sense, Travis is being tugged and pushed in a variety of ways because different people have different ideas about what is best for his future.

Ruth will sometimes encourage Travis to be like his father, Walter, but other times she will lead him away from imitating Walter’s acts. This is due to the fact that Walter’s attitude is always shifting. As your mother has mentioned, it is intended that children would be the driving force behind ambitions by giving them a sense of significance.

  • The fact that Walter wants to provide a better life for his kid, one that is filled with more chances than he had when he was younger, is definitely the driving force behind his unyielding drive to improve himself and become someone greater.
  • The implications that moving to a white neighborhood will have on Travis’s life play a significant role in Walter’s choice over whether or not to proceed with the relocation.
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Travis’s aspirations and dreams for the future are dependent on those of his family until he is of an age when he can take charge of his own life and make his own decisions. Travis is under a lot of pressure to not squander the opportunity that Walter is giving him since he wants to give him the world.

What are Ruth’s dreams?

1. What are the hopes and aspirations of the main characters, Mama, Ruth, Beneatha, and Walter, and how are these hopes and aspirations frustrated throughout the story? Mama has visions of uprooting her family from their claustrophobic apartment and relocating them into a house with a yard, where the kids can run about and play and Mama can care to a garden.

  • Since she and her husband moved into the flat that the Youngers currently occupy, her desire has been put on hold for the foreseeable future.
  • Her aspiration serves as a daily inspiration for her to fulfill her financial responsibilities.
  • But despite the fact that she and her husband put in a lot of effort, they were unable to scrounge together sufficient funds to turn their dream become a reality.

Following his passing, Mama will have the chance to put her plan into action for the very first time thanks to the insurance money. There are several parallels between Ruth’s dream and Mama’s. She has the goal of raising a joyful family and she thinks that a step toward achieving this will be to purchase a home that is larger and of higher quality.

  1. A lack of funds prevents Ruth from realizing her ambition as well.
  2. As a result, she and Walter are compelled to reside in a cramped apartment, and Travis, their son, is had to sleep on the sofa.
  3. Walter has the ambition to one day become wealthy and provide for his family in the same manner as the wealthy folks he drives around.

He frequently describes this goal in terms of his family, expressing his desire to provide for them in a way that he was unable to do for himself. The financial struggles that his family is going through make him feel like a slave. Because of his poverty and inability to locate work that is suitable for him, his goal has been put on hold.

His perspective on his goal of amassing material wealth shifts during the course of the play, and by the time it is through, he no longer considers achieving this goal to be his main priority.2. What does Mama’s plant symbolize, and how does the significance of the symbol change during the course of the play? The fragile yet hardy nature of Mama’s plant is a metaphor for her aspiration to one day reside in a more spacious home complete with a grassy yard, and the fact that she tends to her plant is a reflection of her commitment to realizing that ambition.

The first thing that Mama does is get up early in the morning and pull out her plant. In point of fact, she does it right after getting out of bed, and as a result, we learn right away in the play that both her plant and her dream are of the utmost significance to her.

  1. Mama acknowledges that the plant has never been given a enough amount of sunlight, yet despite this, it has managed to live.
  2. To put it another way, she has never fully realized her goal, but the desire to do so persists.
  3. At the conclusion of the play, Mama makes the decision to transport the plant with her and her family to their new residence.

By doing so, she bestows the plant with a fresh layer of importance. In the beginning, it represented her dream that was still in the future, but now that it has come true, it reminds her of the perseverance she showed by working hard and being patient for such a long time.3.

What kind of impact does the characterization of the Youngers’ flat have on the overall atmosphere of the play? As a result of the fact that the entirety of the play takes place within its four walls, the Youngers’ apartment is responsible for establishing the tone and mood of the whole thing. The Youngers, particularly Walter, have the impression that they are hemmed in by their lifestyle, the ghetto in which they live, and their financial predicament as a result of all three factors.

This sense of being hemmed in is brought home by the stage that Hansberry constructs for the play. The absence of natural light in the apartment is one factor that contributes to the feeling of confinement there. The minuscule quantity of light that is able to find its way into the flat is a reminder of the Youngers’ dreams as well as of the indefinite postponement of those dreams.

Is Ruth pregnant in A Raisin in the Sun?

Act I, Scene II: Once upon a time, freedom was life; now, it’s money. Look Here for Explanations of Important Quotes The Youngers are cleaning their flat the next day, which is Saturday, as they wait for the check from their insurance company to arrive.

  • Willy Harris, Walter’s good buddy and the person in charge of arranging the possible booze shop business, calls Walter on the phone.
  • It would appear that their strategy is proceeding without a hitch.
  • For Walter to continue with the enterprise, all he needs is the check from the insurance policy.
  • He assures Willy that he would provide the funds to him as soon as he gets in possession of them.

In the meanwhile, Beneatha is using insecticide to spray the apartment in an effort to get rid of the cockroaches that have taken up residence there. After Beneatha and Travis got into an argument, Beneatha threatened Travis by pointing the spray pistol at him.

  1. Beneatha picks up the phone when it rings and talks to the person.
  2. To Mama’s disgust, she extends an invitation to see the filthy flat to the person with whom she is speaking on the phone.
  3. Beneatha tells Mama that the man she spoke to on the phone is Joseph Asagai, an African scholar whom she has met at school.

This revelation comes after Beneatha has hung up the phone with the caller. Beneatha’s concerns about her family’s ignorance towards Africa and African people are brought up during their conversation with Mama. Beneatha feels that the African people have a greater need for political and civic redemption from French and British colonialism, whereas Mama believes that the African people have a greater need for religious salvation from “heathenism.” Ruth goes home after seeing a doctor, who informed her that she is two months pregnant at the time of their appointment.

  1. She divulges this knowledge to her mother as well as Beneatha.
  2. Ruth and Beneatha are anxious and unsure, while Mama just says that she hopes the baby will be a girl.
  3. Ruth and Beneatha are scared and hesitant.
  4. Ruth refers to the physician as a “woman,” which causes Mama to become suspicious given that their primary physician is a male.

Ruth is suffering from nausea and anxiety due to her pregnancy. Mama makes an effort to assist her in unwinding. Asagai pays a visit to Beneatha, and during his stay, the two of them get some time to spend alone together. He gives her several things from Nigeria, including music and apparel from that country.

Beneatha is trying on one of the robes, and Asagai inquires about her hair as it is styled straight. He seems to be implying that her haircut is very American and unnatural, and he is curious as to how it got that way in the first place. Beneatha claims that her hair formerly resembled his, but that she no longer likes it in that state since it is too “raw.” He makes light of the fact that she takes finding her identity, and in particular her African identity, via him extremely seriously by teasing her a little bit.

Asagai clearly has a great deal of affection for Beneatha, and he is perplexed as to why Beneatha does not feel the same way towards him. She confesses that she is seeking for something more than a love straight out of a fairy tale. She has aspirations of one day being a free and self-sufficient lady.

Beneatha’s disappointment is compounded by the fact that Asagai disdains her request. Beneatha welcomes Mama into the room and then proceeds to make her acquaintance with Asagai. After then, Mama does her best to recount Beneatha’s thoughts towards Africa and the people of Africa. Beneatha is referred to as “Alaiyo” by Asagai as they are saying their goodbyes to one other.

He says that it is a phrase from his African tribal tongue, and that the meaning of the word, loosely translated, is “One for Whom Bread—Food—Is Not Enough.” He walks away after having won over both of the women. At long last, the cheque is presented.

  1. After returning home, Walter is eager to discuss his intentions for opening a booze shop.
  2. Ruth wants to talk to him about her pregnancy, but he refuses to listen to what she has to say.
  3. This makes her angry.
  4. She sequesters herself away in the bedroom they share.
  5. Mama has a conversation with Walter, who is embarrassed and ashamed about his poverty, his position as a driver, and the fact that he has not been able to advance in his career.
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Finally, Mama reveals to him that Ruth is expecting, and she expresses her concern that Ruth may be contemplating terminating the pregnancy. The only thing that convinces Walter that Ruth is capable of such a deed is the fact that she emerges from the bedroom and demonstrates that she has already paid the initial installment for the service.

Why does Ruth want the money?

“Don’t laugh at me. Pack your things and get out of here! Get out of here and have some fun for a while. Forget about your responsibilities at home and go out and enjoy yourself for once in your life (43). This is a statement made by Ruth, one of the main characters in the Written by Lorraine Hansberry, “A Raisin in the Sun” Due to the unfortunate passing of mama’s husband, she will be getting a cheque for $10,000 from their life insurance policy.

  1. Every single member of the family has their own individual plan in mind on what should be done with the funds.
  2. Ruth is driven by her desire to provide for her mother and the rest of her family, but the lack of financial stability prevents her from doing so.
  3. Her family is the driving force behind her actions.

This is demonstrated by the fact that Ruth is the one who wakes up her family, gets everyone ready for work and school, and then cleans the flat from top to bottom. The first thing that Ruth wants to accomplish is to make sure that they have everything they require and desire.

  1. Despite the many challenges that Ruth has in her life, she is a dedicated family member.
  2. During the conversation that she is having with her mother, Ruth tells her, “Mama, something is occurring between Walter and I.” I am not sure what it is that he requires, but it is something that I am unable to provide for him at this time.

This is the only opportunity he has, Lena (42). Ruth is at a loss as to how she can assist Walter or what is going on, and she has the uneasy feeling that they are growing apart from one another. She desires that her family have all they could possibly want or require.

  1. She gives it her best effort.
  2. Next, Ruth wants to be able to assist her family in any way possible, but there are times when she is unable to do so.
  3. When this occurs, she thinks to herself, “Oh well, they’re certain to fit something in the whole home.” In any case, it would have been foolish to turn down such a tempting offer.

Oh, Bennie! I completely forgot to provide a personal message with it!

What is Ruth Younger motivated by?

In the play “A Raisin in the Sun,” Ruth is shown as a lady who is highly skeptical, realistic, and altruistic. She is also the emotionally and cognitively strongest character in the piece. Ruth is a practical person; she makes an effort to protect and care for her family, even when the members of her family behave in an impolite and disrespectful manner.

Ruth is driven to succeed in the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry because of the support she receives from her family. The goal that Ruth has set for herself is to safeguard her family, and during the course of the play, she achieves so in a number of different contexts; this exemplifies her altruism, tenacity, and work ethic.

Ruth is driven by her commitment to her family, which she will defend no matter what. Because Travis is taking a considerable amount of time in the bathroom, Walter proposes that Travis get up earlier so that other people would have the opportunity to use the restroom.

It ain’t his fault that he can’t get to bed any earlier nights because he got a bunch of crazy good-for-nothing clowns sitting up running their mouths in what’s supposed to be his bedroom at ten o’clock at night,” the person said. “It ain’t his fault that he can’t get to bed any earlier nights because he got a bunch of crazy good-for-nothing clowns sitting up running their (553).

More content Ruth feels irritated by Walter’s behavior. show more Ruth and Walter are disputing about the business that Walter wants to enter into. Ruth is taking Walter’s side. “Why? You’re curious as to why, aren’t you? Because we are all part of a race that is incapable of anything other than whining, praying, and having children, we are all bound together” (584).

  • While Ruth is grounded in the here and now, Walter is focused on making his aspirations a reality.
  • Ruth is doing her best to take care of her family, but Walter makes it difficult for her to assist him, and he also makes it difficult for the rest of the family to get along with one another.
  • Ruth still needs to cope with her own thoughts and challenges, despite the fact that Walter is being impolite and disrespectful.

During their argument, Walter says something really hurtful to Ruth. Walter and Ruth are bickering. (After entering their bedroom, Ruth shuts the door behind her) (575). Ruth is unable to deal with Walter being so cruel to her, so she simply leaves the house.

What does Ruth’s pregnancy represent?

We get a glimpse of the authority that Mama exercises as the matriarch of the household with the revelation that Ruth is expecting a child. She is the pivotal figure in her family’s daily activities, and she has a significant amount of say over how her household members interact with one another.