What Is Walter’S Dream In A Raisin In The Sun?

What Is Walter
1. What are the hopes and aspirations of the main characters, Mama, Ruth, Beneatha, and Walter, and how are these hopes and aspirations frustrated throughout the story? Mama has visions of uprooting her family from their claustrophobic apartment and relocating them into a house with a yard, where the kids can run about and play and Mama can care to a garden.

  • Since she and her husband moved into the flat that the Youngers currently occupy, her desire has been put on hold for the foreseeable future.
  • Her aspiration serves as a daily inspiration for her to fulfill her financial responsibilities.
  • But despite the fact that she and her husband put in a lot of effort, they were unable to scrounge together sufficient funds to turn their dream become a reality.

Following his passing, Mama will have the chance to put her plan into action for the very first time thanks to the insurance money. There are several parallels between Ruth’s dream and Mama’s. She has the goal of raising a joyful family and she thinks that a step toward achieving this will be to purchase a home that is larger and of higher quality.

A lack of funds prevents Ruth from realizing her ambition as well. As a result, she and Walter are compelled to reside in a cramped apartment, and Travis, their son, is had to sleep on the sofa. Walter has the ambition to one day become wealthy and provide for his family in the same manner as the wealthy folks he drives around.

He frequently describes this goal in terms of his family, expressing his desire to provide for them in a way that he was unable to do for himself. The financial struggles that his family is going through make him feel like a slave. Because of his poverty and inability to locate work that is suitable for him, his goal has been put on hold.

  1. His perspective on his goal of amassing material wealth shifts during the course of the play, and by the time it is through, he no longer considers achieving this goal to be his main priority.2.
  2. What does Mama’s plant symbolize, and how does the significance of the symbol change during the course of the play? The fragile yet hardy nature of Mama’s plant is a metaphor for her aspiration to one day reside in a more spacious home complete with a grassy yard, and the fact that she tends to her plant is a reflection of her commitment to realizing that ambition.

The first thing that Mama does is get up early in the morning and pull out her plant. In point of fact, she does it right after getting out of bed, and as a result, we learn right away in the play that both her plant and her dream are of the utmost significance to her.

  1. Mama acknowledges that the plant has never been given a enough amount of sunlight, yet despite this, it has managed to live.
  2. To put it another way, she has never fully realized her goal, but the desire to do so persists.
  3. At the conclusion of the play, Mama makes the decision to transport the plant with her and her family to their new residence.

By doing so, she bestows the plant with a fresh layer of importance. In the beginning, it represented her dream that was still in the future, but now that it has come true, it reminds her of the perseverance she showed by working hard and being patient for such a long time.3.

  • What kind of impact does the characterization of the Youngers’ flat have on the overall atmosphere of the play? As a result of the fact that the entirety of the play takes place within its four walls, the Youngers’ apartment is responsible for establishing the tone and mood of the whole thing.
  • The Youngers, particularly Walter, have the impression that they are hemmed in by their lifestyle, the ghetto in which they live, and their financial predicament as a result of all three factors.

This sense of being hemmed in is brought home by the stage that Hansberry constructs for the play. The absence of natural light in the apartment is one factor that contributes to the feeling of captivity there. The minuscule quantity of light that is able to make its way into the flat is a reminder of the Youngers’ dreams as well as the postponement of those dreams.

What is Walter’s dream in A Raisin in the Sun in Act 2?

Act 2 of “A Raisin in the Sun”: What would you do if you unexpectedly came into more money than you ever dreamed was possible? Following the passing of her husband, Mama Younger is given a check for the amount of $10,000 that was covered by his life insurance policy.

  • The Youngers initially view it as an opportunity to escape their current situation; nevertheless, they quickly come to the realization that they have distinct goals in mind.
  • Beneatha, Mama, and Ruth all want a house, but Travis is more interested in getting an education.
  • The main character, Walter, has the ambition of starting his own company.

In this section of the course, we will accompany the Youngers as they move through Act II of Lorraine Hansberry’s play A Raisin in the Sun.

Did Walter achieve his dream?

For the sake of regaining his masculinity and the respect of his family, Walter made the difficult decision to forgo his long-held goal of operating a liquor shop. It was a difficult choice for him to make because he was already in a difficult situation, but in the end he chose to forego the financial gain in order to show his family that he is proud and that he is not influenced by his fortune.

What is Walter’s dream for the future?

1. What are the hopes and aspirations of the main characters, Mama, Ruth, Beneatha, and Walter, and how are these hopes and aspirations frustrated throughout the story? Mama has visions of uprooting her family from their claustrophobic apartment and relocating them into a house with a yard, where the kids can run about and play and Mama can care to a garden.

  1. Since she and her husband moved into the flat that the Youngers currently occupy, her desire has been put on hold for the foreseeable future.
  2. Her aspiration serves as a daily inspiration for her to fulfill her financial responsibilities.
  3. But despite the fact that she and her husband put in a lot of effort, they were unable to scrounge together sufficient funds to turn their dream become a reality.

Following his passing, Mama will have the chance to put her plan into action for the very first time thanks to the insurance money. There are several parallels between Ruth’s dream and Mama’s. She has the goal of raising a joyful family and she thinks that a step toward achieving this will be to purchase a home that is larger and of higher quality.

A lack of funds prevents Ruth from realizing her ambition as well. As a result, she and Walter are compelled to reside in a cramped apartment, and Travis, their son, is had to sleep on the sofa. Walter has the ambition to one day become wealthy and provide for his family in the same manner as the wealthy folks he drives around.

He frequently describes this goal in terms of his family, expressing his desire to provide for them in a way that he was unable to do for himself. The financial struggles that his family is going through make him feel like a slave. Because of his poverty and inability to locate work that is suitable for him, his goal has been put on hold.

His perspective on his goal of amassing material wealth shifts during the course of the play, and by the time it is through, he no longer considers achieving this goal to be his main priority.2. What does Mama’s plant symbolize, and how does the significance of the symbol change during the course of the play? As Mama tends to her plant, she is metaphorically demonstrating her commitment to realizing her dream of residing in a larger home with a lawn.

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry | Summary & Analysis

Her plant, which is fragile yet tenacious, reflects her want to live in a home with more space. The first thing that Mama does is get up early in the morning and pull out her plant. In point of fact, she does it right after getting out of bed, and as a result, we learn right away in the play that both her plant and her dream are of the utmost significance to her.

  • Mama acknowledges that the plant has never been given a enough amount of sunlight, yet despite this, it has managed to live.
  • To put it another way, she has never fully realized her goal, but the desire to do so persists.
  • At the conclusion of the play, Mama makes the decision to transport the plant with her and her family to their new residence.

By doing so, she bestows the plant with a fresh layer of importance. In the beginning, it represented her dream that was still in the future, but now that it has come true, it reminds her of the perseverance she showed by working hard and being patient for such a long time.3.

What kind of impact does the characterization of the Youngers’ flat have on the overall atmosphere of the play? As a result of the fact that the entirety of the play takes place within its four walls, the Youngers’ apartment is responsible for establishing the tone and mood of the whole thing. The Youngers, particularly Walter, have the impression that they are hemmed in by their lifestyle, the ghetto in which they live, and their financial predicament as a result of all three factors.

This sense of being hemmed in is brought home by the stage that Hansberry constructs for the play. The absence of natural light in the apartment is one factor that contributes to the feeling of captivity there. The minuscule quantity of light that is able to make its way into the flat is a reminder of the Youngers’ dreams as well as the postponement of those dreams.

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What was Walter Lees dream?

Walter Lee Younger DREAM: Success. “I want so many things that they are driving me kind of insane,” says Walter Lee. “I want so many things that they drive me kind of crazy.” His current position as a chauffeur leaves him dissatisfied, so he fantasizes about building a liquor shop, which he believes will serve as a springboard to more money and power.

WHAT HE IS WILLING TO GIVE UP: The cash, his good sense, and his honor were all at stake. To get the firm off the ground, he hands his untrustworthy business partner Willy all of the money, including the money that was supposed to go for Beneatha’s schooling. Willy’s fraud on Walter Lee is compounded by the fact that Willy escapes with the money.

Now that Walter Lee has come to the conclusion that morality is nothing more than a diversion from the cycle of taking or being “tooken” that is the driving force behind the universe, he makes the decision to take Lindner’s money and even makes preparations to put on his own personal minstrel performance.

WHAT HE WILL NOT: He will not take his father’s pride. Throughout the entirety of the play, Walter Lee gives off the impression of being both ambitious and ruthless, as though there is very little that he would not give up to achieve his goals. His fixation with money is called into question by his mother, and in response, he tells her that “money is life.” However, when he is eventually confronted by Lindner at the conclusion of the play, he decides to instead take pride in his family.

He continues, “We have decided to move into our house because my father, my father, he earned it for us brick by brick.”

What lesson does Walter learn in A Raisin in the Sun?

Walter, who is the only son of Mama, Ruth’s obstinate husband, Travis’s concerned father, and Beneatha’s belligerent sibling, acts as both the play’s protagonist and antagonist. He is also the only son of Mama. It is his decisions and actions that drive the storyline of the play, and he is also the protagonist whose personality changes the most during the course of the drama.

  • The majority of his acts and faults caused the family significant harm; nevertheless, due to his delayed maturation, he is portrayed as a type of hero in the last scene.
  • Throughout the course of the play, Walter presents an everyman viewpoint of the Black man living in the middle of the twentieth century.

He has a difficult time providing for his family and is always looking for new and innovative ways to ensure the family’s financial well-being. The challenges and roadblocks, most prominently embedded racism in society, that stand in the way of Walter and his family reaching their goal of financial security are a continual source of frustration for him.

  • He is almost never successful with money, despite the fact that he thinks that it is the answer to all of their issues.
  • There are frequent altercations and disagreements between Walter and Ruth, Mama, and Beneatha.
  • He is by no means an excellent listener, and he does not appear to comprehend that in order to assist his family members, he has to pay attention to the issues they have shared with him.

When he finally comes to the conclusion that he cannot pull his family out of poverty on his own, he looks to his family for support so that they may come together as a unit. As soon as he begins to listen to Mama and Ruth voice their aspirations of owning a house, he recognizes that purchasing a house is more vital for the family’s wellbeing than getting rich quickly.

How is dreams a theme in A Raisin in the Sun?

The Importance of Dreams and Their Role in Life A Raisin in the Sun is a story that primarily focuses on dreams, as the story’s major protagonists try to find a way to deal with the harsh conditions that govern their life. The title of the play makes a reference to a hypothesis that was notably asked by Langston Hughes in a poem that he wrote about dreams that were either lost or put off.

He ponders the possibility that their aspirations will evaporate “like a raisin in the sun.” Every member of the Younger family has their own unique aspiration—for example, Beneatha wants to pursue a career in medicine, while Walter wants to achieve financial success so that he can provide for his loved ones.

Throughout the course of the play, the Youngers work hard to realize their ambitions, and a significant portion of the Youngers’ happiness and melancholy is directly tied to whether or not they are successful in realizing their ambitions. At the conclusion of the play, they come to the realization that the dream of a home is the most significant dream since it will bring the family closer together.

Who revealed Walter’s pregnancy?

Act I, Scene II: Once upon a time, freedom was life; now, it’s money. Look Here for Explanations of Important Quotes The Youngers are cleaning their flat the next day, which is Saturday, as they wait for the check from their insurance company to arrive.

Willy Harris, Walter’s good buddy and the person in charge of arranging the possible booze shop business, calls Walter on the phone. It would appear that their strategy is proceeding without a hitch. For Walter to continue with the enterprise, all he needs is the check from the insurance policy. He assures Willy that he would provide the funds to him as soon as he gets in possession of them.

In the meanwhile, Beneatha is using insecticide to spray the apartment in an effort to get rid of the cockroaches that have taken up residence there. After Beneatha and Travis got into an argument, Beneatha threatened Travis by pointing the spray pistol at him.

Beneatha picks up the phone when it rings and talks to the person. To Mama’s disgust, she extends an invitation to see the filthy flat to the person with whom she is speaking on the phone. Beneatha tells Mama that the man she spoke to on the phone is Joseph Asagai, an African scholar whom she has met at school.

This revelation comes after Beneatha has hung up the phone with the caller. Beneatha’s concerns about her family’s ignorance towards Africa and African people are brought up during their conversation with Mama. Beneatha feels that the African people have a greater need for political and civic redemption from French and British colonialism, whereas Mama believes that the African people have a greater need for religious salvation from “heathenism.” Ruth goes home after seeing a doctor, who informed her that she is two months pregnant at the time of their appointment.

She divulges this knowledge to her mother as well as Beneatha. Ruth and Beneatha are anxious and unsure, while Mama just says that she hopes the baby will be a girl. Ruth and Beneatha are scared and hesitant. Ruth refers to the physician as a “woman,” which causes Mama to become suspicious given that their primary physician is a male.

Ruth is suffering from nausea and anxiety due to her pregnancy. Mama makes an effort to assist her in unwinding. Asagai pays a visit to Beneatha, and during his stay, the two of them get some time to spend alone together. He gives her several things from Nigeria, including music and apparel from that country.

Beneatha is trying on one of the robes, and Asagai inquires about her hair as it is styled straight. He seems to be implying that her haircut is very American and unnatural, and he is curious as to how it got that way in the first place. Beneatha claims that she used to have hair similar to his, but now she believes that it is too “raw” for her liking.

He makes light of the fact that she takes finding her identity, and in particular her African identity, via him extremely seriously by teasing her a little bit. Asagai clearly has a great deal of affection for Beneatha, and he is perplexed as to why Beneatha does not feel the same way towards him.

She confesses that she is seeking for something more than a love straight out of a fairy tale. She has aspirations of one day being a free and self-sufficient lady. Beneatha’s disappointment is compounded by the fact that Asagai disdains her request. Beneatha welcomes Mama into the room and then proceeds to make her acquaintance with Asagai.

After then, Mama does her best to recount Beneatha’s thoughts towards Africa and the people of Africa. Beneatha is referred to as “Alaiyo” by Asagai as they are saying their goodbyes to one other. He says that it is a phrase from his African tribal tongue, and that the meaning of the word, loosely translated, is “One for Whom Bread—Food—Is Not Enough.” He walks away after having won over both of the women.

  1. At long last, the cheque is presented.
  2. After returning home, Walter is eager to discuss his intentions for opening a booze shop.
  3. Ruth wants to discuss her pregnancy with him and feels irritated when he would not listen.
  4. She sequesters herself away in the bedroom they share.
  5. Mama has a conversation with Walter, who is embarrassed and ashamed about his poverty, his position as a driver, and the fact that he has not been able to advance in his career.
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Finally, Mama reveals to him that Ruth is expecting, and she expresses her concern that Ruth may be contemplating terminating the pregnancy. The only thing that convinces Walter that Ruth is capable of such a deed is the fact that she emerges from the bedroom and demonstrates that she has already paid the initial installment for the service.

What are two examples that show Walter has changed in the past week?

In the previous week, Walter has undergone significant change. Please give three examples of this transformation. He isn’t upset with Ruth because he dances with her, and he seems to be a little nicer to Beneatha than he is to Ruth.

What happened at the end of raisin in the sun?

At the conclusion of “A Raisin in the Sun,” the Younger family moves out of their flat on Chicago’s South Side, where they had lived for a very long time, and into a home that they have acquired in Clybourne Park, which is an otherwise all-white community.

  • Even though everyone in the family is feeling optimistic at the play’s last scene, there is no guarantee that things will go smoothly for them in their new existence.
  • The Youngers are left with some lingering ambiguity as a result of a disaster that occurs earlier in the play when Walter loses the majority of the insurance money that was delivered to Mama on account of the loss of her husband.

Everyone who is able to contribute financially should get a job so that the mortgage on the new property can be paid off and basic needs may be met. But because everyone is already operating at or near their maximum capacity, and because the family is expecting another child, there is a possibility that they may not recover in the case of an unexpected emergency or other setback.

Nevertheless, the Youngers show in the end of the play that they believe the unity and dignity of the family is more essential than being able to provide for themselves financially. As shown by the frequent visits of Karl Lindner, the representative of the sarcastically called Clybourne Park Improvement Association, the Younger family is also forced to deal with the difficulties associated with racial discrimination.

When Lindner initially arrives at the Youngers’ flat, he gives off the impression that he is not a threat. On the other hand, he quickly displays an underlying stream of prejudice and, ultimately, danger. After completing his first visit, Lindner asked the resident an overtly racist question, which was part of the message he was supposed to deliver to the community: “What do you think you are going to gain by coming into an area where you just aren’t wanted?” His second visit stirs much more trouble than the first.

  1. As soon as Lindner discovers that Walter has just called him to reassure him that the Youngers would surely move into their new house, he reminds the family of the recent violence that was committed against a Black family in another of Chicago’s predominantly white neighborhoods.
  2. This second Black family may easily presage the Youngers’ destiny in their new land.

In the play’s last act, though, it remains too soon to know. The drama finishes in an environment of both uncertainty and hopefulness for the Younger family.

How did Walter’s dream change?

Both Walter and Mama in Loraine Hansberry’s play A Raisin in the Sun have lofty goals for their lives, but they run across obstacles along the way that make it difficult for them to realize their goals. Willy Harris’s theft of Walter’s money forces him to reevaluate his goal of having a liquor store and being able to better care for his family.

Before, Walter’s goal was to acquire a business where he could sell alcoholic beverages. The possibility of Mama’s money being taken by Willy Harris stands in the way of her fulfilling her ambition of living in a real house with a garden. Walter has a long-held ambition to one day own his own liquor shop and become financially independent so that he can provide for his family.

The realization of Walter’s desire occurs in the first act, scene 1, when he tells Ruth that he and his buddies are going to buy a liquor shop and that this would allow their family to have enough money to do more than simply make it through the month (32,33).

Display further content Walter’s ambition to be able to support his family helps him reconcile his somewhat immoral goals, despite the fact that dreaming of owning a booze store is superficial. After some time has passed, Walter will demonstrate the foolishness of his intention to open a liquor store while he is intoxicated.

In the second act, scene 2, Walter takes Willy Harris’s automobile for a two-day joyride across Chicago, after which he “simply walked” and then “headed to the Green Hat” (2.2 105). Walter’s behavior demonstrates that he is immature and that he places a higher priority on the appearance of wealth than he does on maintaining a job that would enable him to provide for his family.

He also displays that he drinks excessively and does so in front of his family. This is a poor habit that would be exacerbated if he ran a liquor shop and had easier access to alcohol. In addition, he drinks excessively and does it in front of his family. In the third act scenario, Walter is confronted with the challenge of preventing Willy Harris from stealing his money (128).

As soon as the theft occurs, Walter is devastated and wants to use the money that the residents of Clybourne Park donated to keep the Youngers out of their area to restore the insurance money that was stolen (3.1 141,142). Finally, when confronted by Linder, Walter has an aha moment, and his dream shifts such that it is more in line with that of his family.

Does Walter’s dream come true in a raisin in the sun?

Have you ever been in a circumstance in which you had a dream that you’ve always wanted to come true, but someone else put an end to it or told you that it wouldn’t come true no matter how hard you tried to make it a reality? A Raisin in the Sun is a play written by Lorraine Hansberry that shows how the characters Walter, Beneatha, and Mama all had their dreams come true, but not in the way they anticipated.

Each member of the family has their own ideas about what they could do with the life insurance check that was left to them by Mr. Younger, which ultimately results in the construction of barriers between the siblings and Mama. All of their hopes and ambitions revolve around the check that Mr. Younger’s life insurance policy left them.

From the very beginning of the story, we learn that Walter’s ambition is to one day run his own booze shop. When Walter got home from work one afternoon, he asked his mother as soon as he walked through the door, “did it come?” (hansberry 70). When Walter says this, he is giving the impression that his whole life, including his aspirations for his professional life, is centered on the performance.

more content Her personal goal is to one day relocate the household to a property located in a more desirable area. Walter felt certain that he would be able to help his children realize some of their goals and ambitions. It is disheartening when Beneatha and Walter’s hopes and ambitions are thwarted because Willy is the one who ultimately benefits from the money.

Mama’s provides for her entire family and helps improve the quality of life for all of them. Mama is implying that Walter has his sights set on a goal that does not involve the rest of the family in any way. Mama is not being selfish with regard to what she wants for her life and her family by giving up her goal in order to better everyone else’s lives.

At the conclusion of this fantastic tale, Walter, Beneatha, and Mama each had very ambitious ambitions. One was more significant or essential to this family than the others. One of the dreams was more appropriate for the household than the other. The realization of Mama’s desire is made possible by moving into the house.

She will at long last be able to fulfill her lifelong dream of tending a garden of her own. Near the end of the novel, Ausigu made a proposal to Beneatha, and she is considering accepting his offer so that she might travel to Africa and pursue a medical career there.

How does Walter change at the end of the play?

There are times when Walter Younger is really hard to get along with. Throughout the majority of the play’s first act, he behaves in a hostile manner toward almost every other character. He frequently gets into arguments with his sister, Beneatha. He is rude to his long-suffering mother, Lena, and says all kinds of hurtful things to his wife, Ruth.

  1. He is also rude to other people.
  2. It would appear that Walter’s complete and utter dissatisfaction with his life is the source of all of this ugliness.
  3. He is completely unsatisfied with his life as a result of his job as a driver for a wealthy white man.
  4. There is little opportunity for progress, and he despises the fact that he is required to appease his employer on a regular basis.
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Because he is still struggling to provide adequately for his family even though he is well into his thirties, Walter basically feels like less of a man than he should. The only time Walter seems to become enthusiastic in the early stages of the play is when there’s mention of the $10,000 life insurance payout (Walter’s father has died) that’s shortly to come in the mail.

Willy Harris is going to be Walter’s “buddy,” and the two of them intend to utilize the money to open a booze store together. He views this investment as a chance to become his own boss and to finally be able to provide for his family in the manner in which he believes he ought to do so. Everybody attempts to advise Walter against investing in the booze business.

Willy Harris isn’t someone you should put your faith in, Ruth advises her husband. And Lena, a devoted Christian, feels it is wrong to sell booze. Since the insurance policy is in Lena’s name, she maintains complete control over the funds, and she first goes so far as to flat-out refuse to transfer them to Walter.

  1. Instead of giving her son the money for the liquor business, Walter’s mother keeps some of it for herself and uses it as a down payment for a home in a predominantly white area.
  2. The realization of this plunges Walter into the abyss of hopelessness.
  3. He goes on a three-day drinking spree and refuses to go to work.

Eventually, Lena gives up and lets Walter take a substantial piece of what’s left to invest whatever he sees appropriate. Additionally, she believes that her son will save some of the money for Beneatha in a bank account so that she may attend medical school.

Walter doesn’t do this, though, and merely passes it all over to Willy Harris for the booze shop. At this moment in the play, we get a peek of who Walter would be if he was pleased with his professional life. He is cordial to his sister, gives his mother a hug, and even takes his wife out on a date, during which they get quite sexual with one another while holding hands.

The Walter that we know is an affable and kind individual who values his family. When we reach this part of the text, we have the thought, “Wow, I suppose he’s not such a jerk after all.” Unfortunately, this won’t keep up for very long. The fact that Willy runs off with all of the money proves that everyone was right to have their reservations about the investment in the booze business.

Things go from bad to worse in this location. Earlier, a white guy who lived in the new area and went by the name of Mr. Lindner attempted to bribe the Youngers with money so that they would not move into their new house. When Walter was at the top of his game, he cockily booted Mr. Lindner out of the business and informed him that they did not require his financial support.

However, Walter is in a hopeless state right now. After reaching a new low, he decides to pick up the phone and contact Mr. Lindner, telling him that he would take the money. For the sake of obtaining the money, Walter reveals to his loved ones that he is ready to submit to “The Man.” This moment represents Walter’s lowest point for the entirety of the play.

  1. He is willing to completely disgrace himself for the sake of the money.
  2. However, in the end, Walter is vindicated since he ultimately chooses not to accept the money that Mr.
  3. Lindner offers him.
  4. When the white guy makes his way back, Lena makes Walter have a conversation with him in front of Travis, who is Walter’s little son.

In front of Travis, Walter simply cannot bring himself to behave in such a disgraceful manner. In the end, Walter is able to regain his self-respect and guides his family to the new home they had purchased. In spite of the fact that Walter is the character in the play who develops the most during the course of the story, he is also the one who commits the most egregious errors.

His transformation transforms him from a complete jerk who was fixated on quick ways to make money into a guy deserving of respect. In her play Walter Younger, Lorraine Hansberry demonstrates how the interplay of poverty, racism, and depression can distort and depress individuals to the point where they turn against those they love the most.

The author of the play shows us, of course, how these societal barriers may be overcome by personal tenacity and by being loyal to one’s own views. This is demonstrated via the character of Walter.

What is the American Dream in A Raisin in the Sun?

In “A Raisin in the Sun,” what does Walter’s dream consist of? Getting rich and maintaining their current standard of living is one of Walter’s goals in life. He dreams of the day when he will be the one who drives him about and holds doors open for him.

His goal is unattainable; he wants his wife to be able to look beautiful in pearls and he wants his son to do great things in life. Throughout the course of the book, we see Walter’s aggression increase as a result of the fact that he is not content with his current situation, both mentally and financially, and nobody in the house wants to hear him out on this liquor store.

This is displayed in Act I Scene I when Walter was trying to have a conversation with Ruth about how sucky his life is and how he only has stories about how rich white people live to tell his son, and Ruth responds by telling him to “Eat your eggs, Walter.” At this point, we observe Walters venting his aggravation about the fact that nobody pays attention to what he has to say.

When Mama sends Walter Lee $6,500, which is $3,500 for him and $3000 to deposit for Beneatha’s medical school, he goes and deposits the entire amount, which is a significant sacrifice on Walter Lee’s part. Later on, towards the close of Act II, it is revealed to us that Walter has misplaced all of the money.

“Son Have you lost it? Son, here is the six-five hundred bucks that I handed to you. Have you lost it? The whole thing? The money of Beneatha as well?” After that, Walter gives a response saying, “Mama, I have never been to the bank at all.” Walter doesn’t do the morally responsible thing and go to the bank; instead, he takes a massive risk, which ends up not just being disastrous for him but also for a far wider range of individuals than just himself.

Beneatha isn’t shocked by her brother’s failure, and she thinks he’s going crazy since he’s always worrying about money. “done almost lost his mind thinking about money all the time,” she says. Beneatha’s hopes and dreams will be dashed if this scenario plays out. The family falls into an even deeper melancholy as a direct result of the fact that he winds up losing all of this money.

Taking chances, defying the standards set by society, and making sacrifices are necessary steps on the path to realizing the American dream. Mama was successful in accomplishing her objective of moving out of the teeny, cramped apartment and buying a house for her and her family, which was Mama’s desire.

Despite the fact that they did not reach the American Dream, Mama was successful in accomplishing her goal. To Mama, the American Dream was not so much about fortune and celebrity as it was about happiness and independence, both of which she achieved in the end, which demonstrates that she was successful in achieving the goal.

Because of the way the play comes to a close, we are unable to learn whether or not Beneatha ultimately followed her ambition and moved to Africa with Asagai or whether or not she became a physician. According to the events of the play, Walter never achieved his version of the American Dream, which was to become wealthy.

How is the American Dream shown in A Raisin in the Sun?

To succeed in life despite one’s background or identity is a defining characteristic of an American, according to this definition. In the 1950s, this dream was centered on the importance of material possessions. This play is about a family, and each member of the family has a distinct dream about their life as African Americans.

  • The play also focuses on the family’s journey.
  • The lesson that Walter, Mama’s son, learns is that pride and preserving what his father has achieved are more valuable than money in the long run.
  • The fundamental themes of the play include learning to love and supporting one another during challenging circumstances.

Despite the fact that they have darker complexion, they are ultimately successful in achieving the American ideal. Get Assistance With Your Essay Here If you are having trouble writing your essay, our company offers a professional essay writing service that you may use for assistance.

What is the American Dream in the book raisin in the sun?

For Walter, realizing the American Dream meant climbing his way out of poverty. He planned to accomplish this goal by starting a liquor store in order to earn the necessary funds. His aspiration had to be put on hold since he was unable to provide for his family financially.

What is American Dream in Death of a Salesman?

The protagonist of the play “Death of a Salesman” views the “American Dream” as the capacity to amass wealth through one’s own personal charm alone.